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Askold Melnyczuk

www.askoldmelnyczuk.com

Askold Melnyczk

Askold Melnyczuk, who is a recipient of the The Association of Writers & Writing Programs’ George Garrett Award for Outstanding Community Service in Literature, founded AGNI Magazine in 1972.

He received a Lila Wallace-Readers’ Digest Award in Fiction in 1997. In addition to the McGinnis Award in Fiction, Melnyczuk has also been awarded grants from the Massachusetts Cultural Council in fiction, poetry, and nonfiction. He has published stories, poems, translations, and reviews in The New York Times, The Nation, The Partisan Review, Grand Street, Ploughshares, Poetry, and The Boston Globe. His poems have been included in various anthologies, including The McGraw-Hill Book of Poetry, Literature: The Evolving Canon, and Under 35: The New Generation of American Poets.

A much beloved teacher of writing and literature, Melnyczuk currently teaches at the University of Massachusetts, Boston and at the Bennington College, MFA Program. He previously taught at Harvard University and Boston University. A research associate of the Ukrainian Institute at Harvard, he has served on the boards of the New England Poetry Club and PEN New England and has been a fellow of the Boston Foundation. In 2001 he received PEN American Center’s biennial Nora Magid Award for Magazine Editing as well as PEN New England’s “Friend to Writers” Award.

Excerpts from Melnyczuk’s  anti-memoir in progress have appeared recently in The Threepenny Review and Epiphany. The Epiphany excerpt, “Turbu-lence, Love,” was cited as Notable in The Best American Essays 2010. His third novel, The House of Widows (Graywolf Press), won the Editor’s Choice Award from the American Library Association as one of the out-standing books of 2008.

New Releases:

What Is Told

 

PFP Publishing is extremely pleased and honored to announce the release of a new edition of Melnyczuk's novel, What Is Told  in print and eBook versions. 

 

 

 

 

ambassador of the dead

 

A print and eBook version of Ambassador of the Dead was released in the Fall. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Praise for Melnyczuk's Work:

What is Told

Melnyczuk  is “a wonderful writer and a virtuoso stylist…”                          - Publishers Weekly

“To fall in love with Melnyczuk’s voice is no trouble at all….”                      - New York Times Book Review

What Is Told is “Magnificent in scope….Brilliantly Melnyczuk skips across decades and continents, from lyric passage to coarse account, from domestic scene to philosophical musing.  His blend of myth and realism—punctuated with violence and comedy—recalls Garcia Marquez.”                  - The Boston Globe

Ambassador of the Dead

"A very powerful and disturbing novel; recommended for all libraries... Melnyczuk explores profound questions related to violence, the weight of the past, and the kind of pain from which it is impossible to recover."        - Library Journal

"Melnyczuk intelligently explores the problems of assimilation, the pain of war, and the fear of leaving the past behind, and he poignantly captures the disillusionment and disappointment when the American dream never     materializes."                                                                                          - Booklist

"Melnyczuk writes exceedingly well-controlled miniature narratives that begin as soft-focus reveries and develop into darker tales that confidently clinch the attention and release it just as smoothly. Recollections that might have fizzled in another author's hands here grow luminous and haunt-ing."                                                                                                        - Publishers Weekly

melnyczuk

"Good work, the writing that matters, does so because it records perceptions we might have overlooked in our busy world. Its value derives from giving voice to all those who might otherwise pass invisible through life."    

 

(Askold Melnyczuk, from his George Garrett Award Ceremony address)